Welcome to the RedVee.Net forums!

By registering with us, you'll be able to discuss Rugby League, chat all things Saints and share opinions with other RedVee.Net members.

SignUp Now!

Mergers/ Going out of business!

How do you create personalities and narratives when the majority of the game is robotic, structured and a dull watch to those already invested in the game? You aren’t watching Darts to watch someone play slowly and take their time at the oche, you’re watching because Luke Littler is a showman and he’s allowed and encouraged to be himself. Our halves, the creative players in our sport, are told to play the numbers and percentages. When was the last chip and chase you saw? God knows. It used to be common place in the early noughties.
 
How do you create personalities and narratives when the majority of the game is robotic, structured and a dull watch to those already invested in the game?
Personalities aren't really created. People tend to see through such as artificial. You begin with making media work a fundamental component of every player's week. And I'm not just talking about half an hour on a Friday morning. They've have to be far more available than what they currently are. I mean, there are players who've been at teams for years and yet the fans know hardly anything about them. The SKY crew's jaws were on the floor when Lomax did his little presentation on the touch-screen a couple of seasons ago. Who could have believed he can speak so intelligently about the game? Well ... anyone who has talked to him for any length of time! Just look at the way kids faces light up when Jack Welsby is signing autographs. Look at the number of "1 - Welsby" shirts on match days. And yet reading the Saints website you could be forgiven for thinking he's some kind of scrub for the pathetic number of minutes he gets. Invite the media into the clubs and make it clear that they will get quality time with whoever they want to speak to. Not five minutes during which they shove a recording phone under the nose and then are out the door. Writers and broadcasters need content. They are desperate for it. They can't create it out of nothing. And the clubs have an inexhaustible goldmine of content they could be offering. All it needs is for someone to scoop it up.
 
Personalities aren't really created. People tend to see through such as artificial. You begin with making media work a fundamental component of every player's week. And I'm not just talking about half an hour on a Friday morning. They've have to be far more available than what they currently are. I mean, there are players who've been at teams for years and yet the fans know hardly anything about them. The SKY crew's jaws were on the floor when Lomax did his little presentation on the touch-screen a couple of seasons ago. Who could have believed he can speak so intelligently about the game? Well ... anyone who has talked to him for any length of time! Just look at the way kids faces light up when Jack Welsby is signing autographs. Look at the number of "1 - Welsby" shirts on match days. And yet reading the Saints website you could be forgiven for thinking he's some kind of scrub for the pathetic number of minutes he gets. Invite the media into the clubs and make it clear that they will get quality time with whoever they want to speak to. Not five minutes during which they shove a recording phone under the nose and then are out the door. Writers and broadcasters need content. They are desperate for it. They can't create it out of nothing. And the clubs have an inexhaustible goldmine of content they could be offering. All it needs is for someone to scoop it up.

If writers cannot create content then something is seriously wrong, which it is. The standard of RL journalism is dire. I know the bigger ones are only needed when there is a big game and have a finite amount of words/column space but the "best" RL websites we have are Love Rugby League and Serious About RL, which are pretty poor. You just get articles that are clickbait nonsense or a series of "Seven players still off contract", "Five players you'll never guess played for both Hull teams". Following other sports, there are far better amateur journalists (bloggers, writers, whatever you want to call them) creating content than anything available in rugby league. Not to knock RedVee, years ago there were pretty regular articles on the main site and they have been infrequent for years now. The rise of social media has probably played a part in all of this too.

You certainly need to create narratives and personalities or at least the platform to show a personality. Jonny Lomax's story is ridiculous, lets be honest. Most people would have given up the sport when he nearly died as a teenager, most people would have certainly retired after one massive knee injury, let alone two. To then go on and win five Grand Finals, a Challenge Cup, a World Club Championship and play for his country whilst also being highly intelligent and intellectual. We know his story because we are Saints fans. I'm sure there's stories out there around the lives of Super League players at your Huddersfield's and Salford's but they're not told or given the platform to, so most people in rugby league don't know about them, let alone anyone we might try and attract to the sport in years to come. Looking at that Sky interview with Jonny Lomax, it was done outside in front of a tele wheeled in and covered in gaffa type. It just paints a crap image regardless of what was actually then being said. It's unprofessional and small time, much like the Sky team getting kids crashing into them and being inaudible over the mic because of music blasting in the stadium. The closest we have got is Sky creating and pushing the nauseating nickname of Jake "The Snake" Connor, which absolutely nobody called him bar Bill Arthur, which was a success actually when you consider that he actually managed to call someone by their actual name and not call them Kevin Naiqama.

Creating a sport those already invested in the sport want and like is vital. They're you're greatest cheerleaders (or doom-mongers) and they're already there, no convincing, no bullshit. Looking on here, looking at social media and what other fans post, many are of the same opinion and with people that aren't enjoying or happy with the sport, its going to be hard to excite and interest people that aren't presently interested and excited. I'm not having a pop because they're rivals but Wigan getting 13,105 and 12,167 in 2023 against Warrington and Leeds respectively is poor, really poor. Where have the Wigan fans gone? Why aren't they attending? It's the same across the board and certainly at our big events too.

I want to be excited by games involving other clubs. I want to look forward to Leeds v Warrington, as I have done in the past, but these days it is such a robotic and stagnant game that I really don't care about other games. I'll stick games on but there aren't non-Saints games that I have to watch anymore. There's too many games, they're ruined by knit picking and looking for inconsistencies in refereeing performances and the MRP, there's little consequence for losing a game and you don't miss anything anymore. If you miss Leeds v Warrington, it'll probably get played again in 4-6 weeks, they'll possibly get pulled out in the cup and they might even end up being 6th v 3rd in the playoffs, too, so its going to happen and happen again soon. There's no buildup or tension created because these games are so common.
 
If writers cannot create content then something is seriously wrong, which it is. The standard of RL journalism is dire. I know the bigger ones are only needed when there is a big game and have a finite amount of words/column space but the "best" RL websites we have are Love Rugby League and Serious About RL, which are pretty poor. You just get articles that are clickbait nonsense or a series of "Seven players still off contract", "Five players you'll never guess played for both Hull teams". Following other sports, there are far better amateur journalists (bloggers, writers, whatever you want to call them) creating content than anything available in rugby league. Not to knock RedVee, years ago there were pretty regular articles on the main site and they have been infrequent for years now. The rise of social media has probably played a part in all of this too.

...

I want to be excited by games involving other clubs. I want to look forward to Leeds v Warrington, as I have done in the past, but these days it is such a robotic and stagnant game that I really don't care about other games. I'll stick games on but there aren't non-Saints games that I have to watch anymore. There's too many games, they're ruined by knit picking and looking for inconsistencies in refereeing performances and the MRP, there's little consequence for losing a game and you don't miss anything anymore. If you miss Leeds v Warrington, it'll probably get played again in 4-6 weeks, they'll possibly get pulled out in the cup and they might even end up being 6th v 3rd in the playoffs, too, so its going to happen and happen again soon. There's no buildup or tension created because these games are so common.
I think one of the biggest problems is how we are dealing with the head injury situation. For over a hundred years Rugby League has worked at its own pace and been the sole architect of its fortunes (aside from the arrival of SKY, the money they invested and the demands they had in exchange). Now the sport is caught between the horns of on the one side the insurer (the fact that so few companies are willing to provide cover for the sport is very concerning) and the threat of litigation brought by ex-players, who regardless of whether you believe their cases to be frivolous or not - they will more than likely succeed because rugby league has always been so slap-dash with its protocols. You just know that when the discovery process kicks into high gear you're going to discover they never dotted their i's and crossed their t's with respect to paperwork. I really dread to think what the lawyers will turn up once they start rifling through cabinets. Fans might not like players suing the sport but I think it probably needs to happen just to drag us into the 21st century.

In the meantime we just seem to be clumsily reacting to the next problem coming down the pike instead of getting out in front of them and being pro-active. Fans can say they like change but the truth is they don't. They really don't. And for many fans changes which are perceived negatively are happening just too thick and fast. And the tendency is always to project such changes onto the future, "If things are happening like now where will we be in five years?"

It's a valid question to ask because there doesn't seem to be any light at the end of the tunnel and rugby league isn't providing the kind of leadership which will address fans' understandable concerns.

There is absolutely no confidence that the next change in the rules will be the last. I mean, you can make deliberate attacks to the head a thing of the past with Draconian punishments. It doesn't alter the fact that most head injuries these days are caused not by foul play but accidental head clashes. Indeed, accidental clashes are going up because players are now being forced into aiming lower in the tackle (something they haven't done since they started) and poor technique results in them being knocked out because their heads aren't in the right spot. Chronic brain issues are less a product of foul play than the logical end result of playing collision sports where players are getting bigger, stronger and more explosive every season.

Couple this with the fact that the entire business model for major sports broadcasters has undergone a pretty radical shift over the last ten years. Instead of trying to cover as many sports as possible to the highest level possible they are now concentrating far more on a core group of globally recognized sports whose appeal is limitless.

These are extremely challenging times and without strong leadership from Rugby League/SL HQ it's difficult to be optimistic about the future.
 
ESPN Highlights from the Indiana Fever's win over the Washington Mystics. Caitlin Clark drops 30. First million dollar gate in the team's history. She's some player. And everyone in the WNBA should be on their knees thanking her for all of the money they are going to make over the coming years. Before Clark nobody gave a damn. Check out the comments section. It's illuminating.

 
Entertainment has very little bearing on popularity next to personalities. There was plenty of entertainment in the women's NBA for years. Nobody watched. Caitlin Clark arrives from college and gates triple overnight. Teams are forced to change venues to accommodate. Hell, even their opponents were selling out allocations.

This notion that the game needs to squeeze out every last drop of enjoyment to appease an audience is flawed reasoning. One superstar personality achieves more than a hundred rule changes. It changes everything.
Hard to disagree. Its the same with football as well, their product hasn't been exciting or entertaining for years (I swear every time I sit down and watch a PL match, it ends 0-0 or 1-0 with barely any chances) but its huge because all of their players are stars. That is definitely something we need to work on more than anything else, but its a tough one because you can't inorganically create stars either. The first step would obviously be giving these lads far more exposure than they currently get and you need to present them like they're big deals. Even though its a unique selling point in itself, I don't think the whole "working mans game" and "these players are so accessible and they're just like me and you" helps us on that score. They need to be presented like they're special, and when you look at guys like Welsby, French, Roby etc, they are special.
 
Hard to disagree. Its the same with football as well, their product hasn't been exciting or entertaining for years (I swear every time I sit down and watch a PL match, it ends 0-0 or 1-0 with barely any chances) but its huge because all of their players are stars. That is definitely something we need to work on more than anything else, but its a tough one because you can't inorganically create stars either. The first step would obviously be giving these lads far more exposure than they currently get and you need to present them like they're big deals. Even though its a unique selling point in itself, I don't think the whole "working mans game" and "these players are so accessible and they're just like me and you" helps us on that score. They need to be presented like they're special, and when you look at guys like Welsby, French, Roby etc, they are special.
There are a ton of personalities inside every dressing room. You've just got to let them have their voice. Look at the difference in the Saints players when Louie used to walk in the room or a joker like Percy. These are all fascinating characters in their own right. You can't be a professional rugby league player without having a few screws unwound. It's impossible to become invested in people who might as well be mute. The teams are all paranoid about handing a professional advantage to the opposition by being too open or players becoming too full of their own self-importance. But you've got to see the bigger picture. If a young player lets the media go to his head then you have to be willing to see that as the price of doing business. Because not opening up at all is KILLING US.
 
It's all well and good Niall Evalds being hilarious and able to tell funny jokes, Herman Ese'Ese having the ability to have Jack Ashworth and Franklin Pele absolutely mystified by his ability to do magic tricks or Tyler Dupree being charitable and spending a few hours a week helping out in a food bank in Wigan and taking ten minutes away from Brian Carney, Jon Wilkin and Jon Wells talking nonsense on Sky on a Friday night to tell those stories but who is actually watching that and learning about those stories? It's people like us. It's not John who lives in Bournemouth or Roy in Glasgow, lets be honest. They're not watching now and they're not just suddenly going to start watching because Sky have sent a camera to Salford's training ground or a player's house instead of having more time previewing Hull FC v Leeds Rhinos. I don't disagree that we need to see more of player's and to tell their stories but its about who you're telling those stories to and presently, its existing rugby league fans. They're, largely, going to watch whether you spend time interviewing players or telling a story about their life, upbringing or career or previewing that rounds games.

Get your existing rugby league fans fired up and excited again and then start telling stories. Give them a sport they actually like, want to attend and get excited about. The only thing that gets rugby league fans speaking in unison is the disciplinary process, analysing tackles with a fine toothcomb and awaiting the MRP Monday afternoon bingo. It's rare you get people talking up the qualities of a match and eulogizing about the sport and the competition. What do people look forward to now aside from their own teams games? Gone are the days you needed to watch a Bradford v Leeds game, its not an issue if you miss a war of attrition like yesterday's cup final.
 
It's all well and good Niall Evalds being hilarious and able to tell funny jokes, Herman Ese'Ese having the ability to have Jack Ashworth and Franklin Pele absolutely mystified by his ability to do magic tricks or Tyler Dupree being charitable and spending a few hours a week helping out in a food bank in Wigan and taking ten minutes away from Brian Carney, Jon Wilkin and Jon Wells talking nonsense on Sky on a Friday night to tell those stories but who is actually watching that and learning about those stories? It's people like us. It's not John who lives in Bournemouth or Roy in Glasgow, lets be honest. They're not watching now and they're not just suddenly going to start watching because Sky have sent a camera to Salford's training ground or a player's house instead of having more time previewing Hull FC v Leeds Rhinos. I don't disagree that we need to see more of player's and to tell their stories but its about who you're telling those stories to and presently, its existing rugby league fans. They're, largely, going to watch whether you spend time interviewing players or telling a story about their life, upbringing or career or previewing that rounds games.

Get your existing rugby league fans fired up and excited again and then start telling stories. Give them a sport they actually like, want to attend and get excited about. The only thing that gets rugby league fans speaking in unison is the disciplinary process, analysing tackles with a fine toothcomb and awaiting the MRP Monday afternoon bingo. It's rare you get people talking up the qualities of a match and eulogizing about the sport and the competition. What do people look forward to now aside from their own teams games? Gone are the days you needed to watch a Bradford v Leeds game, its not an issue if you miss a war of attrition like yesterday's cup final.
I've been listening to fans gripe about the game for decades. It never changes and I've heard every conceivable reason why the sport is failing. It's ALWAYS FAILING! If it wasn't bringing in a set number of tackles, or moving away of player specialization or Wigan buying the title or Lindsay shafting half the teams near the bottom of the competition or mergers or summer rugby or referees or any of innumerable sleights against the game. What we see today is nothing new. Change is inevitable. Some punters feel they can't deal with it and that's ok. We all grow as people and move on to new things. The next bunch of kids coming through the door aren't burdened with the weight of history and they accept the game for what it is. Those kids watching Wigan and Warrington yesterday think the sport is special - just like we all did at that age.
 
I've been listening to fans gripe about the game for decades. It never changes and I've heard every conceivable reason why the sport is failing. It's ALWAYS FAILING! If it wasn't bringing in a set number of tackles, or moving away of player specialization or Wigan buying the title or Lindsay shafting half the teams near the bottom of the competition or mergers or summer rugby or referees or any of innumerable sleights against the game. What we see today is nothing new. Change is inevitable. Some punters feel they can't deal with it and that's ok. We all grow as people and move on to new things. The next bunch of kids coming through the door aren't burdened with the weight of history and they accept the game for what it is. Those kids watching Wigan and Warrington yesterday think the sport is special - just like we all did at that age.
It’s hard to see how the game yesterday was special JM! Overall, I take your point though; change is inevitable and a good thing, unless it involves total extinction, that’s not so good
 
It’s hard to see how the game yesterday was special JM! Overall, I take your point though; change is inevitable and a good thing, unless it involves total extinction, that’s not so good
Just look at the kids faces. You can't fake that. I think back to some of the games that got me pumped as a sixteen year old. A lot of them are available on YouTube and I've watched a bunch. If I'm being honest and outside of their context many were pretty bad. But I wasn't thinking that at the time. It's a weird feeling.
 
It's all well and good Niall Evalds being hilarious and able to tell funny jokes, Herman Ese'Ese having the ability to have Jack Ashworth and Franklin Pele absolutely mystified by his ability to do magic tricks or Tyler Dupree being charitable and spending a few hours a week helping out in a food bank in Wigan and taking ten minutes away from Brian Carney, Jon Wilkin and Jon Wells talking nonsense on Sky on a Friday night to tell those stories but who is actually watching that and learning about those stories? It's people like us. It's not John who lives in Bournemouth or Roy in Glasgow, lets be honest. They're not watching now and they're not just suddenly going to start watching because Sky have sent a camera to Salford's training ground or a player's house instead of having more time previewing Hull FC v Leeds Rhinos. I don't disagree that we need to see more of player's and to tell their stories but its about who you're telling those stories to and presently, its existing rugby league fans. They're, largely, going to watch whether you spend time interviewing players or telling a story about their life, upbringing or career or previewing that rounds games.

Get your existing rugby league fans fired up and excited again and then start telling stories. Give them a sport they actually like, want to attend and get excited about. The only thing that gets rugby league fans speaking in unison is the disciplinary process, analysing tackles with a fine toothcomb and awaiting the MRP Monday afternoon bingo. It's rare you get people talking up the qualities of a match and eulogizing about the sport and the competition. What do people look forward to now aside from their own teams games? Gone are the days you needed to watch a Bradford v Leeds game, its not an issue if you miss a war of attrition like yesterday's cup final.
Well when I say give them more exposure I mean away from the scheduled RL programming. Get them on sky sports news, make posts about them on Twitter with highlight reels or even reels about them winding up opposition fans etc etc.

Obviously having personality isn’t enough to make a star, you have to have the ability to back it up on the pitch as well. But someone like Welsby who is a monster on the field and seemingly has the ability to piss everyone off should be all over social media or doing appearances on sky sports news/other talk shows etc. get them on loose women, bbc breakfast and shit like that. Get videos of them posted on tik tok and Twitter. Get stories about them printed in the paper, get them at events and premieres etc etc. you need to present them like stars for them to feel like stars.
 
More exposure would, in theory, also open up more opportunity for sponsorship deals for them as well
 
Well when I say give them more exposure I mean away from the scheduled RL programming. Get them on sky sports news, make posts about them on Twitter with highlight reels or even reels about them winding up opposition fans etc etc.

Obviously having personality isn’t enough to make a star, you have to have the ability to back it up on the pitch as well. But someone like Welsby who is a monster on the field and seemingly has the ability to piss everyone off should be all over social media or doing appearances on sky sports news/other talk shows etc. get them on loose women, bbc breakfast and shit like that. Get videos of them posted on tik tok and Twitter. Get stories about them printed in the paper, get them at events and premieres etc etc. you need to present them like stars for them to feel like stars.

Nobody really knows who they are. You're not just going to get Liam Farrell on Loose Women this week with the cup and his medal on chatting to some old tart that was on Eastenders in the 90's because we'd like it. That's without even considering what a saturated market it is. I agree with what you say but it's not as easy as that, unfortunately.
 
But it isn't a poor product. It's never been a poor product. Eddie Hearn was asked about the commercial viability of rugby league. He said - point blank - "Without personalities it has none". The average rugby league fan brought up on the sport will very often stick with it through thick and thin. Sure, there will be some years where they don't go to matches. Don't buy a season ticket. Or even watch games (maybe when they get married, have children, finances are tight etc). But it'll always be there for them to return to whenever personal circumstances dictate.

But to attract new fans in large numbers you need personalities for them to gravitate towards and personal rivalries. Nothing sells with as much success. People are far too wrapped up with the concept of the sport without recognising that a fundamental component of sport is entertainment. Martin Offiah was a great player not just because he was fast, immensely talented and a winner. He also had a huge personality and expressed himself on the field and infront of the cameras. People couldn't get enough of Alex Murphy - on a national stage - not just because he was a great player. What attracted folk to Murphy was vicarious entertainment. Freakishly talented with a mouth that functioned as a force multiplier. Men wanted to be him. Women wanted to be with him. Shove a mic in his face and he always had something to say. The home fans cheered on his antics whilst rivals couldn't wait to see him fail. Hell - they're STILL talking about his bet to jump off Runcorn bridge TODAY! Just as they laugh about Murphy telling Raudonikis he was the second best player on the pitch. "What we do in life echoes through eternity" ... two simple offhand comments which have echoed through the sport for decades.

Ask fans to name their favourite players. Mine are Tommy Martyn, Sean Long, Louie, Jack Welsby and a few others. What's the common denominator? Ask rival fans which Saints players they HATED. It'll be a pretty similar list. Why? Because these were/are great players who expressed personalities which you either love or loathe. And when two players on opposite teams start winding each other up - light the blue touch paper, stand back and wait for it to explode.

"Knock on Tommy", Louie getting into the faces of pie eaters every time he played at the JJB, Sean Long running around with St. Bernard's head on his shoulders, Kevin Ward hiking up his shorts every time he got mad and began running wild. Ask a Warrington fan to name his favourite moments on a rugby field. I guarantee many will include Tommy Martyn getting the ball reefed out at Wilderspool and the look of suprise on his face. It's stuff like this which fuels passion in fans. Ask a pie-eater and they will talk far more about Morgan Smithies and pals getting into the face of Jack Welsby than they will about the game!

Until the sport finds a way of encouraging players to express their personalities (instead of running around like faceless automatons) it'll never arrest the slide. Can the rules of the game be improved? Sure. But the gains you'll make are several orders of magnitude below the investment viewers will have in two personalities butting heads.
Remember when Paul Scuthorpe was the face of Gillette advertising ? That is what we need again but there is nobody known well enough in RL to be used
 
Remember when Paul Scuthorpe was the face of Gillette advertising ? That is what we need again but there is nobody known well enough in RL to be used
That's why the sport has to do some of the heavy lifting. The clubs must take media more seriously. Make it a core deliverable - as much as success on and off the field. Every player should have a media presence to some extent either on social media (or if they feel less comfortable - within the club's website). There should be one or more cameras rolling at the club 24/7 as well as someone working in the editing room. Get the lads more comfortable in front of cameras. Encourage independent media. There are an awful lot of young people coming out of colleges and universities who have a ton of ideas and technical knowledge. They just don't have access. You've got to give it to them - within a framework. Quid pro quo. The major media companies aren't going to stoop to our level. But you can meet them halfway. At the very least all of this footage should serve as a valuable archive for future generations. Because what's the point of all this hard work and effort if nobody knows anything about it? Superstars will emerge organically. You just have to give them a voice and let them do their thing. If we have a few missteps and casualties - that's the price of doing business. Not a reason to shut up and play dumb. I hate this Tall Poppy syndrome in RL. You get players making an effort and everyone jumps on their back in criticism instead of thinking about the big picture and what they might do to help propel the sport forward. Players are our most marketable resource. About time we realized this.
 
Last edited:
And still get better crowds than London
Featherstone have paid the ultimate price of chasing the Holy Grail
Ie promotion to SL and failed. It clearly shows that if your business model doesn't have substance then this will have ramifications further down the line.
 
Remember when Paul Scuthorpe was the face of Gillette advertising ? That is what we need again but there is nobody known well enough in RL to be used
That was good advertising for us, but it didn’t come about through any awareness of RL. One of Saints Directors at the time ( I think it was Tony Colquitt? ) was also a Director of Gillette. Also they only showed Scully in the N. Of England.
 
Last edited:
That was good advertising for us, but it didn’t come about through any awareness of RL. One of Saints Directors at the time ( I think it was Tony someone) was also a Director of Gillette. Also they only showed Scully in the N. Of England.
It does help if you have a player who looks like a character someone drew up in Fallout 3: New Vegas maxxing out every skill and perk, tho ... ;) :D
 
That's why the sport has to do some of the heavy lifting. The clubs must take media more seriously. Make it a core deliverable - as much as success on and off the field. Every player should have a media presence to some extent either on social media (or if they feel less comfortable - within the club's website). There should be one or more cameras rolling at the club 24/7 as well as someone working in the editing room. Get the lads more comfortable in front of cameras. Encourage independent media. There are an awful lot of young people coming out of colleges and universities who have a ton of ideas and technical knowledge. They just don't have access. You've got to give it to them - within a framework. Quid pro quo. The major media companies aren't going to stoop to our level. But you can meet them halfway. At the very least all of this footage should serve as a valuable archive for future generations. Because what's the point of all this hard work and effort if nobody knows anything about it? Superstars will emerge organically. You just have to give them a voice and let them do their thing. If we have a few missteps and casualties - that's the price of doing business. Not a reason to shut up and play dumb. I hate this Tall Poppy syndrome in RL. You get players making an effort and everyone jumps on their back in criticism instead of thinking about the big picture and what they might do to help propel the sport forward. Players are our most marketable resource. About time we realized this.
Rumour super league is taking a match to Vegas with the NRL 2025
 
Back
Top Bottom